5 Best Attractions In Nagasaki – What To See In Nagasaki

Nagasaki At Night - Nagasaki AttractionsNagasaki is a great city that has rebuilt quite a bit from the destruction of World War II. However, with all the rebuilding the city had undergone it can be difficult to pick out which one of the major attractions you would want to see in the city. Now, I know for a lot of people all they are going to just think about Nagasaki as being the city that was hit by the second atomic bomb in the world. This is not the case and this is a city that you will want to make sure you know about the amazing attractions to check out and then you will be able to find the best places for you to check out in Nagasaki and know you will have a great vacation.


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How Did I Narrow Down The Choices I Made

I know that Nagasaki, like most of Japan, is filled with history. So I took the historical sites into account and even started to take into account the history and the rebuilding of some of history that was ruined by the bombing. At the same token, I know many tourists like to come with their families to the locations they are vacationing in and that is the other factor I took into account and have come up with what I feel are a blend of different locations that everyone is going to love and want to enjoy a the best Nagasaki attractions.


5. Mount Inasa

Mount Inasa may not seem like it would be that attractive of a location and I will admit that I am a little worried about putting this on the list as at the top you usually only get to see some of the radio and television transmitter towers. However, I will tell you that one thing that you will really like about this location is the view. You will have a commanding view of the city and the surrounding area that you can see from here and it will make it easier for you to have a great trip and be able to see everything you would have wanted to see from above. What else is nice is this makes it easier for you to plan out your trip of where you are going to go.

As a word of caution you are going to have access only via the ropeway if you do not have a car. Some people will find this a little bit frightening, but you will find that this is going to make it quite a bit easier for you to enjoy the trip because it gives you a more authentic feel of the location and this will make it easier for you to have a good great trip that you can enjoy and experience some great culture of Japan.

4. Nagasaki Prefectural Art Museum

The art museum here is one that you are really going to enjoy because it definitely provides you with plenty of art to see. However, this is a lot more than the traditional style of art that you would expect to see when you are in Japan. Instead, you will notice the Nagasaki Prefectural Art Museum is going to have some of the modern art you would expect to see in Nagasaki, but it also has a very strong mixture of Spanish art. This is definitely something that is different compared to what the people would be expecting to see when they are in Nagasaki, but it is definitely going to be a great way to spend the day.

A great aspect of the museum is the fact that you are able to get the enjoyment of the large park that is nearby. The park is definitely a great place to relax, but it allows you a chance to go back through the art museum in your mind and start to reflect on what you have seen and what the artists were trying to convey. What else is great about this location is as of right now it is still the hidden gem of Nagasaki so it is missing a lot of the crowds you would be seeing in a lot of the other major attractions in Nagasaki.

3. Dejima

Dejima is a location that recalls the isolationist past of Japan. This is the one area in Japan during the Edo period that would allow for any outsiders to be located. The island itself is an artificial island and it is one that held a lot of the Dutch traders that were going to be isolated from Japan. While this island is going to be a little bit on the minimal side, you will notice it is in the process of being restored to what it would have looked like when the Dutch traders would have been present on the island. The restoration process will take some time and until it is finished you do have a chance to check out a miniature model of the location and even visit the museum.

2. Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum

The atomic bombs ended World War II, but they definitely caused a lot of destruction and ruin in the world and definitely in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. When you are at this museum it will definitely allow you to recall the history of the region before the bomb hit and after. The museum is a very powerful place to go and you will be able to have a great trip because you are going to see how this region has rebounded from the atomic bomb that hit the city to end World War II, but also how it has started to flourish to a great area that you are going to want to check out and visit.

What is really amazing is the resilience of the people of Nagasaski and how they have bounced back. You can see in the traces that are present in the timeline just how much the city has bounced back quite a bit. However, you are sure to see just how much this one bombing ended up changing the world forever. Just remember some people are still surviving as of this writing and while they are older they can still recall the memory of the bomb dropping. You may even want to tour the Nagasaki peace park when you are here as well.

1. Huis Ten Bosch

What you may not realize is the Dutch had a strong presence in Nagasaki. Some of it was as a trader and merchant, but some more of it was more along the lines of friendly people as well. To that end the people of Nagasaki have went and recalled this history and connection with the Huis Ten Bosch. This area is one that is going to simply amaze you with the theme park like atmosphere, but the way the Dutch village has been completely reconstructed here in the form of a 17th-century look that people may have never seen before.

What is really great about this place is the location is complete with all the different canals you would expect to find in the region and even the windmills. The theme of the location is one that you will find enjoyable as well and what is really nice is the way that you are able to enjoy the location. The pleasure comes from hotels, restaurants, shops, and even different attractions you can check out and know it is going to allow you to have a great time because you are able to see and do everything you would have wanted to do.

How To Pick What To See In Nagasaki

This is where your part comes in and that is you have to figure out what you want to see and do. I have provided you with the list of the Nagasaki attractions that I love, but I have to admit there is so much more to Nagasaki than what you were expecting. No matter what, I have provided you with the 5 best attractions in Nagasaki for you to check out and explore and know you could easily have a great vacation.

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Author

  • Yin-Le Wang

    Yin-Le Wang is a distinguished author and cultural connoisseur, renowned for her profound expertise in Japanese travel and traditions. Born into a family passionate about exploration and the rich tapestry of global cultures, Yin-Le embarked on her first journey to Japan as a young girl, an experience that ignited a lifelong love affair with the country's diverse landscapes, ancient rituals, and the subtle artistry of daily life. With an academic background that marries the humanities with Oriental studies, Yin-Le has spent decades traversing the length and breadth of Japan, from the snow-capped peaks of Hokkaido to the tropical beaches of Okinawa. Her writing, characterized by vivid storytelling and deep cultural insights, serves as a bridge between the East and West, inviting readers into the heart of Japan's most sacred spaces and bustling urban centers alike. Yin-Le's works include a series of critically acclaimed travel guides, cultural essays, and photographic journals, each piece a testament to her immersive approach and meticulous research. A fluent speaker of Japanese, she has formed enduring relationships with locals across the country, granting her access to hidden gems and stories often overlooked by the casual traveler. Beyond her writing, Yin-Le is a sought-after speaker at cultural festivals and academic forums, where she shares her nuanced understanding of Japan's evolving identity in the global landscape. Her blog and social media channels are treasure troves of travel tips, culinary recommendations, and philosophical musings on the Japanese way of life, followed by a global audience of travel enthusiasts and culture vultures. Yin-Le Wang is not just a guide to Japan's geographical marvels; she is an ambassador of its soul, offering a lens through which the world can appreciate the intricate beauty and enduring traditions of this enchanting land.

By Yin-Le Wang

Yin-Le Wang is a distinguished author and cultural connoisseur, renowned for her profound expertise in Japanese travel and traditions. Born into a family passionate about exploration and the rich tapestry of global cultures, Yin-Le embarked on her first journey to Japan as a young girl, an experience that ignited a lifelong love affair with the country's diverse landscapes, ancient rituals, and the subtle artistry of daily life. With an academic background that marries the humanities with Oriental studies, Yin-Le has spent decades traversing the length and breadth of Japan, from the snow-capped peaks of Hokkaido to the tropical beaches of Okinawa. Her writing, characterized by vivid storytelling and deep cultural insights, serves as a bridge between the East and West, inviting readers into the heart of Japan's most sacred spaces and bustling urban centers alike. Yin-Le's works include a series of critically acclaimed travel guides, cultural essays, and photographic journals, each piece a testament to her immersive approach and meticulous research. A fluent speaker of Japanese, she has formed enduring relationships with locals across the country, granting her access to hidden gems and stories often overlooked by the casual traveler. Beyond her writing, Yin-Le is a sought-after speaker at cultural festivals and academic forums, where she shares her nuanced understanding of Japan's evolving identity in the global landscape. Her blog and social media channels are treasure troves of travel tips, culinary recommendations, and philosophical musings on the Japanese way of life, followed by a global audience of travel enthusiasts and culture vultures. Yin-Le Wang is not just a guide to Japan's geographical marvels; she is an ambassador of its soul, offering a lens through which the world can appreciate the intricate beauty and enduring traditions of this enchanting land.